We’ve all had it: the dreaded stomach ache. It can strike at any time: too much to eat while binge-watching TV, heartburn from some seriously spicy Thai food, too many turns on the Tilt-A-Whirl, or, worst case scenario, the stomach bug. Regardless, it all means one thing – you don’t feel well and you want relief now.

There are a lot of ways to treat tummy troubles that are a lot gentler on your system and don’t involve reaching in the medicine cabinet right away. Here are some of the tried and true methods from the SmartyPants team.

Chamomile Tea

It’s a pretty amazing herb that, surprisingly, grows like a weed in most places. It’s also one of the most popular herbs in the world. Chamomile contains anti-inflammatory and relaxing properties, all of which make it good for soothing the stomach. Studies have also shown that chamomile may increase urinary levels of glycine, an amino acid that has been shown to relieve muscle spasms. So it’s no wonder chamomile can relieve an upset stomach, stomach cramps, and occasional abdominal gas. It’s is best when consumed as a tea.

5 Little-Known Things Killing Your Good Gut Bugs

Ginger

A go-to for pregnant women around the world, ginger comes in many forms to calm your belly, especially nausea. It’s effective for morning sickness, motion sickness, and the “maybe I had a little too much rosé last night” sickness we can sometimes get. The forms it takes are varied, so you’re sure to find some way to help you ease your abdominal woes. There’s ginger tea, candied ginger, ginger ale, ginger capsules, and even fresh ginger right off the root. It’s a little spicy, so be forewarned. However, it works like a charm due to the oily resin that’s reputed to provide both pharmacological and physiological responses. Long story short: it’s totally worth the zestiness.

Club Soda and Bitters

This is a traditional digestif and much gentler on your system than some of the more traditional OTC indigestion remedies. Angostura is probably the best known premade bottled version, but Fee Brothers also makes incredible bitters in a variety of flavor profiles. If you want even more control over the flavor, ingredients, and even the option to make them alcohol free, you can also make your own with incredible results.

Peppermint

There’s a reason restaurants have a bowl of mints by the door on the way out. Peppermint helps aid digestion and soothes both nausea and indigestion. Peppermint tea calms as well,
so it’s often given when a stomach bug is making the rounds. You can very easily make your own with fresh peppermint steeped in hot water. It also tastes incredible iced. But be careful:
it can exacerbate heartburn, so steer clear if that’s a concern for you.

Rice Tea

To make a rice “tea”, boil 1/2 cup of rice in six cups of water for about 15 minutes. Strain out the rice, then flavor the water with a dash of honey or sugar and drink warm. Rice tea does double duty here. Both the “tea” and the cooked rice can soothe an upset stomach.

The BRAT Remedy

This stands for Bananas, Rice, Applesauce, Toast. If you’re feeling a little queasy, any one of these foods can help settle your stomach, give your gut a chance to relax, and eliminate gastrointestinal distress.

Probiotics

Maybe we’re a little biased, but we think probiotics are the greatest thing to help pacify your belly. There are many choices, from kefirs and yogurts to capsules and tinctures, but we’re particularly fond of SmartyPants Adult Probiotic Complete and Kids Probiotic Complete. Our multi-strain probiotics come in spore form – the form that can survive the test of time, changing temperature, and harsh stomach acid. Natural microencapsulation ensures that 99% of our probiotics reach all the way to your large intestine alive, where they can flourish, multiply, and help you thrive. Take two per day and keep your guts happy.*

These are just some of the many tried and true remedies for temporary upset stomach and nausea. Obviously if stomach issues persist, please see your physician to rule out something more serious.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Posted on June 29, 2017